Building History - Roman Roads and Aqueducts (Building by Don Nardo

By Don Nardo

The Romans have been the main marvelous developers of the traditional global. And between their most opulent and enduring works have been millions of miles of roads and aqueducts that carried very important exchange items, information, and life-giving water to hundreds of thousands of individuals.

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These connected to a wood-burning, kiln-like furnace situated just outside the structure. 32 The inn also had a blacksmith’s shop, a shed for wagons, and a stable big enough to keep about a dozen horses or other animals. In some areas, especially where a major road passed through or near a town, travelers had a choice of eating places. If they did not wish to have their meals in an inn, they could go to a restaurant. All towns had small snack bars (thermopolia) that sold both hot and cold fast food.

What could I have done better? For I began by surveying and taking the levels of the mountain, I drew plans and sections of the whole work, to take extra precaution, I summoned the contractor and his workmen and began the excavation in their presence. . [Later, I found that] the contractor and his assistants had made blunder upon blunder. In each section of the tunnel they had diverged from the strait line, each towards the right. Quoted in Ivor B. Hart, The Great Engineers. Freeport, NY: Books for the Libraries, 1967, p.

If they did not wish to have their meals in an inn, they could go to a restaurant. All towns had small snack bars (thermopolia) that sold both hot and cold fast food. Common fare included meat, bean, or lentil stews; fish; porridge; bread; cheese; fruit; and baked pastries for desert. Pompeii, a typical large Roman town, had close to two hundred such snack bars. There were also more formal sit-down restaurants ((popinae), often with two or three small dining rooms. Pompeii’s main street alone had twenty eating places of one kind or another.

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